Milwaukee Area Technical College: Partnering to Meet Community Needs in Milwaukee

Medical professional speaks with nursing students


United Health Foundation announced a grant partnership with Milwaukee Area Technical College to double the size of the school's registered nursing program over the next three years and help address the state's growing nurse shortage.
 

There is a growing health care challenge sweeping across the United States that has the ability to impact each and every American: a rising shortage of nursing professionals. This is a two-pronged problem as patients are not the only people suffering from the shortage. Nursing professionals are often forced to endure long hours in stressful, fatigue-inducing conditions, pushing them to leave the profession at alarming rates. The result: A clear and immediate need for greater outreach and recruitment of students to nursing programs.

To provide patients with the best health care, nurses must receive support, attention and mentorship both before and after joining the workforce. To aid in this effort, United Health Foundation (UHF) has formed a new partnership with the Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) with an aim of reducing the community's nursing shortage.

UHF and MATC are partnering with Milwaukee hospital systems, including 24 clinical sites, to provide support for staffing and clinical opportunities. Over the next three years, the $2.3 million United Health Foundation partnership grant will help MATC:

  • double enrollment beginning fall 2017;
  • increase capacity to graduate an additional 100 students by year three;
  • hire 16 new nursing program instructors;
  • support recruitment of low-income students; and
  • assist with placement services once students graduate.

This partnership will aide in training the next generation of health care professionals to address the nursing shortage in Milwaukee. Ensuring these health care professionals have the skills and resources necessary to improve the quality of patient care will help achieve more positive patient outcomes both now and into the future.

(January 2017)